BLOG: CAN I WORK AND STILL RECEIVE SSI BENEFITS?

BLOG: CAN I WORK AND STILL RECEIVE SSI BENEFITS?
An individual may earn wages and continue to receive Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid benefits despite their disabling impairment.
SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME CASH BENEFITS
Special SSI cash benefits are for individuals whose gross income exceeded the established limit in the month of INITIAL eligibility. If you are eligible for special SSI cash benefits, you continue to be eligible for Medicaid benefits.
Requirements
1. The individual was eligible to receive regular SSI benefits the month before the determination is made for Special SSI benefits;
2. The prior eligibility for regular SSI benefits was not terminated;
3. The month the determination is made for ‘special’ status, the individual’s income exceeds government guidelines;
4. The individual continues to have a disabling impairment;
5. The individual meets all the citizenship or residential requirements of the regular SSI program;
6. The termination of the individual’s Medicaid eligibility status would seriously interfere with that person’s ability to continue working;
7. The individual’s earnings are not sufficient to provide themselves with the reasonable equivalent of the SSI benefits including additional state supplemental funding for attendant care assistance.
Consideration for special status is automatic and no additional application is required. It occurs when you report additional income that exceeds the government set standards.
SPECIAL STATUS vs NON ELIGIBILITY
Special status allows the applicant to continue to receive Medicaid benefits even if they are no longer qualified for SSI cash benefits. It also facilitates reacquiring SSI eligibility when the individual’s income no longer exceeds the federal cut-off limit versus having to make an entirely new initial application for benefits.
To prove you need Medicaid benefits in order to continue to work, you must establish:
(a) That you are currently using or have received services which were paid for by Medicaid during the period which began 12 months before our first contact with you to discuss this use; or
(b) That you expect to use these services within the next 12 months; or
(c) That you would need Medicaid to pay for unexpected medical expenses in the next 12 months.

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